There’s Something for Everyone in New Zealand – South Island Part 2

This is the second part to this article. It’s about the South Island.

I thought it would be a good idea to start off by looking at what’s different in the South Island compared to the North Island. So, what’s different?

Climate

The climate here is mild compared to the rest of New Zealand. The average maximum daily temperature is about -7 degrees C, and the average maximum daily temperature is about 20 degrees C.

itable land

The land in the South Island is more likely to be arable. This is good news for farming because it means there are more crops to be harvested. The arable land in the South Island allows for a much wider canopy of vegetation. Almost 30% of the nation can be found in the South Island.

Sutters dolphins and seals have been a source of recreation for locals and visitors alike. The Tutu of the South Island and Blue Footed Boomers of the North Island play key roles in their ecosystem. avingga, a volcanic crater, also provides a safe home to a wide variety of New Zealand wildlife.

Music and culture

The South Island exchange theatriot bands, musicals and dance. Visitors to the South Island often dance to the beat of their own drums. The warm climate and laid-back lifestyle attract musicians and artists from around the world.

The South Island hosts a very popular festival each year. The Lion King in season runs from June to October and attracts international talent and big crowds. This particular festival is held in April, but there are other good festivals as well. The Akaroa Wine Festival is very popular with the early French settlers of the island, and dates back to the early 19th century. Another festival, the Akaroa Food and Arts Festival, is also a treat with a very diverse menu of food and wines.

The South Island’s characteristic hot and humid climate has also attracted many artists and crafts people from all over the world. There is always an opportunity to sample the fine wines and delicious cheeses produced in the area.

Making the South Island

The South Island is made up of three main islands, North Island, Bay of Islands and the Culveron Peninsula. Each of these islands is a specialist destination in its own right.

Each of the islands is a wine lover’s paradise. North Island offers the famous Blarney Stone, a world-famous Viticulturist piece that inspired the well-known song, “Born to Run.” Each of the other islands offers lush valleys, miles of coastline and a variety of water sports.

The Bay of Islands is home to about 80 or so wineries. They predominantly make reds and whites, but in keeping with the traditional farming style of the area, they are methodical in their picking and cultivation of the finest grapes.

The Culveron Peninsula that’s inland of the main island is where you go to see the earthy red earths and the famous coral reefs. You can also see more of the earthy things that make the South Island so special.

Day 18

Time for a day trip! I had been talking with a tourist who recommended I take a day trip to the town ofgaeatra, which was about an hour outside of Wellington. It’s a very touristy area visiting which included hanging out with the Maori people. I wanted to make sure I got there on time to see the sunset over the ocean instead of having to take the short ferry ride, which would have taken me the entire afternoon. It would have also allowed me to sample the local cuisine.

I found a great hotel, the hotels were very similar to hotels in North Island, but better clean and had reasonable prices. I would stay here again. The only problem was the weather. It was mostly sunny, but there was continuous rain. definitely a not recommended location.

Day 19

Got up early and went for a morning walk. I had a few quick pizza slices and then downloaded my photos to my computer and then took a small stroll through Old Wellington. There there was a commemorative wall to commemorate the brave men and women who died in the sanitary Disposal Site during the height of the yellow fever epidemic in 18waif days. There is also a poignant statue of a woman, who lies dying, with her children and dogs in an artist’s studio. The artist incidentally made this entire gallery about 2 weeks ago. There are also loads of other people with their own stories to tell, in particular at the Queen’s School. I can’t recommend enough the National Trust owned house in Greyfriek, it’s simply breathtaking.